Steel Structures

If your project requires more than a single beam it is called a steel structure

From your initial home/extension design you will have had architectural drawings which will then have been passed on to a structural engineer who brings your vision into the real world. Your structural engineer will have created drawings with a steel structure to ensure your design, when it comes to life, is entirely structurally sound.

These structural engineer’s drawings of your steel structure are what we need for you free quotation!

From these drawings we will create a list of steel beams, columns and connections needed to create your structure. We will email you these back to confirm along with your quotation so you know exactly what we have been quoted you for!

Although all steel structures are bespoke depending on the building design; the number of storeys, the space you are creating, the spans and any existing layout, many structures have similar designs and functions, you can see some more common examples below.

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box frame

Box frame

A box frame structure is composed of a top steel beam supported either end by vertical columns and a bottom steel beam that adds rigidity to the structure. This type of structure is mostly used when removing a wall. The structure used to support the building where the wall has been removed and the bottom beam. It also helps to minimise ground works needed.

box frame with cross beam

Box frame with cross beam

This structure is used as the box frame where you are removing two walls. For example, taking out the back wall of a property to put in bi-fold doors whilst also removing the partition wall between a kitchen and dining room. The end of the adjoining beam will then sit on a supporting wall at its open end.

box frame with beam and post

Box frame with beam and post

With the same format as the box frame with cross beam. When a supporting wall is not available for the adjoining beam to sit on an additional column must be used to transfer the load to the foundation.

box frame with perpendicular box frame

Box frame with perpendicular box frame

Again with the same format as the box frame with a beam and post, adding a bottom beam is sometimes required to spread the weight, and strengthen the structure if a load is particularly high.

2 box frames with cross beam

Two box frames with cross beam

When two box frame sections are joined by a perpendicular beam. This structure tends to be used when two parallel walls are removed and a perpendicular load bearing wall above needs supporting. Sometimes the cross beam is used to support a chimney breast.

box frame with extended beam

Box frame with extended beam

Essentially a box frame where the one side is unable to go up against a wall. For example, to incorporate a corridor. The free end of the beam would rest on a supporting wall.

cross beam

Cross beam

A cross beam structure consists of two beams connected at a right angle. The ends of each beam will sit on supporting walls or columns to transfer the load. It can be used to support the ceiling span of a room or internal walls above.

2 beams with cross beam

Two beams with cross beam

Similarly to a single cross beam structure the end of each beam will sit on supporting walls or columns to transfer load. It can be used to support larger ceiling spans or can be used as a support structure for a chimney breast. The parallel beams span the room on both sides of the chimney, and the cross beam supports the chimney itself. Quite often a top plate is added to this beam in order to spread the support across the entire area of the chimney.

crank with cross beam

Crank with cross beam

Often used in loft conversions and new roofs the crank angle follows the angle of the roof structure whilst the cross beam supports the roof joists.

apex

Apex

An apex consists of a double cranked beam creating an angle structure and is supported by ‘main beam’ as per the diagram. This structure is usually used when building to create a pitched roof or when adding an additional floor to an existing building.

post with beam

Post with beam

This structure is used when a beam is needed for support but only one end is supported by a load bearing wall, the other end is connected to a column for support.

goalpost

Goalpost

As the name suggest a goalpost structure compromises of a central beam supported by two parallel columns. Goal post structures tend to be used when a supporting beam is needed but neither end is able to be supported by load bearing walls. For example when no party wall is in agreement.

goalpost with cross beam

Goalpost with cross beam

This structure is used akin to the box frame with cross beam where you are removing two walls. For example, taking out the back wall of a property to put in bi-fold doors whilst also removing the partition wall between a kitchen and dinning room. The end of the adjoining beam will then sit on a supporting wall at it’s open end. Unlike the box frame there is no need for a base beam as the structural loads do not require it.

goalpost with 2 cross beams

Goalpost with 2 cross beams

Similar the goal post with a singular cross beam this structure tends to be used when taking out multiple walls in a property or if when removing the main wall and the ceiling span is too large to be support by only a singular beam. The open-ended beams will be supported at their far end by a supporting wall.

beam with mid support

Beam with mid support

A beam with mid support is used when a beam is needed for a structure, but the load is so much that an additional column support is needed to transfer the load to the foundations. The column provides extra support for the beam. Although called a ‘mid-support’ the actual location of the supporting column will depend on the layout of the room and will not always be central.

2 goalposts with cross beam

Two goalposts with cross beam

Sometimes when taking out two walls in a property, for example when making a ground floor ‘open plan’, there can be stability issues for the entire building. Having a structure of two goal posts at apposing ends of the structure as well as a cross beam stabilises the ground floor and the structure of the entire building.

corner beam with post

Corner beams with post

Corner beams with a post are there to reinforce both rear and side walls. This structure is usually present in extensions especially where both the rear and side walls remain as large opening for glass doors or windows.

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